Forming in the U.S.A.


 

The 18 pilots of the newly formed 1846 Naval Air Squadron with one of their Corsair aircraft at USNAS Brunswick. The commanding officer, Lt. Cdr (A) D.G. Brooker RNVR is stood third from the right rear row. Click image to view larger version

 

The 18 pilots and 14 S.N.C.O.s  of of the newly formed 1846 Naval Air Squadron with one of their Corsair aircraft at USNAS Brunswick. The commanding officer, Lt. Cdr (A) D.G. Brooker RNVR is seated centre front row. An unidentified US Navy officer is seated to his right. Click image to view larger version

 

The full complement the newly formed 1846 Naval Air Squadron with two of their Corsair aircraft at USNAS Brunswick.  Click image to view larger version

 

One of the squadron's Corsairs about to taxi out of its parking space for a training flight at USNAS Brunswick. This aircraft carries the side code '5V4' and the letter 'E' on its undercarriage flap.

 

A group of pilots pose with a Corsair after a training flight from USNAS Brunswick.

 

The same six pilots as in the picture above?

 

Aerodrome Dummy Deck Landing practice (ADDLs). An 1846 squadron Corsair comes in to land having been guided to touch down by the Deck Landing Control Officer (DLCO) or 'Bats' at the edge of the runway while other pilots watch their colleges efforts.

 

 

 

 


Operations with HMS COLOSSUS


 

The Light Fleet Carrier H.M.S. COLOSSUS at sea somewhere in the Pacific. A single Corsair of 1846 is ranged in front of the forward lit and two of 827 squadron's Barracudas are parked at the after end of the flight deck.

 

The  flight deck of COLOSSUS with the Corsairs of 1846 preparing to launch on a training flight, probably in the Mediterranean during working-up. The Corsairs are now wearing the code '5+'. The Barracudas of 827 squadron are ranged, wings folded at the after end of the deck.

 

The officers of 1846 pose with a Corsair on the flight deck of COLOSSUS. probably in the Mediterranean during the ship's working-up period. Click image to view larger version

 

The squadron personnel in tropical whites on board H.M.S. COLOSSUS. Sub-Lt A, Jones is seated to the left of the Royal Marine officer in the centre of the second row, Click image to view larger version

 

Somewhere in the Pacific. The Corsairs are now wearing the the distinctive British Pacific Fleet roundels on the wings and fuselage as well as a large capital 'D' on their tail fin to denote they belong to COLOSSUS. The side codes have also changed to three numbers in the range 111 - 131.

 

Corsair '123' is readied for an accelerated take-off, the catapult strop is in place and ratings are waiting to remove the wheel chocks. Last minute instructions are padded to the pilot  on a blackboard.

 

Corsair '122' making a 'dirty pass' down the side of the ship - wheels, flaps and arrestor hook all down - before beginning a landing approach. Note the large centre line drop tank between the main wheels.

 

A flight of four aircraft in line astern formation.

 

A flight of Corsairs of 1846 Squadron, believed to be over Cape Town, C. February 1946.Sub-Lt A, Jones is in the aircraft furthest from the camera - this machine has the cartoon nose art seen in the next picture.

 

The nose art worn by Corsair KD750 '117/D'/

 

All images courtesy of Mr. Ian Jones, son of Sub-Lt (A) Anthony Jones RNVR who flew with the squadron from its formation to its disbandment.

 

 

Back to 1846 Squadron history

 

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